It has been exactly one year since my last blog post. I haven’t posted anything for so long because I was busy working, and then finishing my Research Master. To avoid the temptation of not finishing my studies at all, and just go make things full time, I decided just to not blog at all. Now that I’ve handed in my MA thesis, I can finally spend more time making things and writing about it.

That doesn’t mean that I didn’t make anything last year, though. Quite the opposite: I carved more spoons than ever, and made quite a few other things. You can see what I’ve been up to recently on Instagram.

With the end of my studies, also came a few other changes: I’ve recently moved into a new workshop. Or I should say: I now have a workshop. I used to do most of my work around the house. Mainly on the kitchen table, or on my desk behind my computer. You can imagine this was not ideal. The new place isn’t huge, but it has tons of daylight and is very close to where I live. It’s ideal for leatherworking and some smaller woodworking.

I’ve recently made some big changes to the website. It used to be a blog, primarily, with a page for selling stuff. It’s now basically a webshop where I sell my products, with a blog. It’s still a work in progress, but it should be done soon. You can expect more frequent blog posts from now on. I’m building a small roubo-style workbench right now, which I’ll write a post on soon. I will also regularly put new products of for sale on the site. If you have any questions or suggestions, please let me know!


A Kuksa – or Guksi in Finnish, kåsa in Swedish – is a traditional wooden drinking cup. It is usually made out of birch, usually its burl (a bulbous random growth on the tree). They are quite large, and burl is quite difficult to come by and to carve. I recently got a nice burl to carve a kuksa from. But I really didn’t want to ruin it because of my lack of experience in carving these things, so I put it in the freezer for now. Instead, I took a piece of normal birch to practice on and carved these two smaller, tea kuksa’s. One is sanded and the other one is knife finished. both hold about 130ml, just under the average volume of a cup of tea.

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Last summer I wrote a post about building a Japanese tool chest, to take some tools with me while traveling. Over the last year I’ve done a lot of green woodworking. I’ve learned a lot about wood and the tools that are needed to turn that wood into things. I’ve carved a bunch of spoons, some oak spatulas, I’ve made a couple of oak benches, and a bunch of other stuff. I’ve bought and made quite a few new tools as well. This summer we planned to go to the German Eifel to stay in a log cabin in the woods for two weeks, and I came prepared. So, a year after I made the Japanese tool chest, here is my essential green woodworking kit in that chest.

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This post is mainly to clear a bad backlog of things that were supposed to go on the blog. Some of these things I made as long as 10 months ago, others a few weeks back. They’re not big projects (that’s why it’s another small leather projects post, of course), but I think they’re worth sharing with you.

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Until now, I mainly used a hatchet, puukko and some spoon knives for carving. I often felt like I was using a cannon to kill a mosquito while using the hatchet, and like I was using a spoon to dig my way through a mountain while using the knives. In short: I missed something in between the hatchet and the knives. A tool that can chop, but with precision. That can waste wood quickly, but not too quickly. A tool that could still be used to carve without it becoming tiresome. As it turns out, this new Leuku I made is such a tool.

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