Spoons (2014 spring edition)

This blog post is long overdue. I carved the spoons below over the last couple of months. As you can see, I’ve been experimenting with different types of wood and different shapes. Most of them are finished with a homemade wax, a mixture of walnut oil, beeswax and a bit of orange oil. They were all finished with a bit of sanding. The 5 eurocent coin is about 20 mm in diameter.

Birch sauce ladle

Birch sauce ladle

 

Birch sauce ladle (side view)

Birch sauce ladle (side view)

 

 

Big birch serving spoon

Big birch serving spoon

 

 

Big birch serving spoon (side view)

Big birch serving spoon (side view)

 

 

 

Ash serving spoon

Ash serving spoon

Catalpa spoon for serving around corners

Catalpa spoon for serving around corners

Sycamore (London plane) spoon

Sycamore (London plane) spoon

 

Sycamore (London Plane) spoon (side view)

Sycamore (London Plane) spoon (side view)

 

 

Birch spoon

Birch spoon

 

 

 

Birch spoon

Birch spoon

 

 

 

plum eating spoon

plum eating spoon

unidentified wood tea spoon

tea spoon, unidentified wood. I’m pretty sure this is bald cypress, though (taxodium dichistum).

Birch scoop

Birch scoop

Maple dessert spoon

Maple dessert spoon

Maple dessert spoon

Maple dessert spoon

horse chestnut dessert spoon with blue stained handle

Horse chestnut dessert spoon. Handle is stained blue.

 

This spoon was a bit of an experiment. I tried to stain part of the handle. As you can see, the fibres on the inside of the log transported the stain up, while the outside didn’t. This spoon is also the only one finished with a light coat of shellac.

unidentified wood server

server, unidentified wood.

I have no idea what kind of wood this is. It came from a shrub. I didn’t see any leaves because it was cut down in winter. The wood smells faintly of green bell peppers. I used the same wood for the handle on this knife.

birch soup spoon

birch soup spoon

Pencil cedar serving spoon

Pencil cedar serving spoon

Carved from the same pencil cedar, and with roughly the same model as one of my first spoons.

birch dessert spoon

Birch dessert spoon. Made from a branch of the birch in the back yard of the house where I grew up.

 

 

Sycamore (London Plane) eating spoon

Sycamore (London Plane) eating spoon, with some light spalting.

 

 

 

 

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